Everything You Need to Know About Guitar Tonewoods (In Alphabetical Order!)

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If you’re a guitarist, new or experienced, you should have an idea of what different guitar woods mean for an instrument’s sound. Popular woods are all utilized for particular reasons. As you read the following paragraphs, you’ll discover a selection of common guitar tonewoods, alphabetically listed, and the purposes they serve. It does bear noting that there are differences between guitar body woods and neck woods. The guitar tonewoods that you’ll see featured here are body woods.

 

  1. Ash wood first became popular in the 1950s when it was used by an incredibly popular brand of guitar. Swamp ash, which is derived from the lower sections of wetland trees that grow their roots beneath the surface of the water, is the best option for crafting guitar bodies. This form of ash wood is known for it’s twangy, sweet melodies that graced early rock and roll music and today’s country genre.

 

  1. Basswood is a widely available sort of wood and is, as a result, commonly called upon when budget guitars are being produced. If you happen to be a novice guitarist who decided not to rush into investing in an expensive instrument, the guitar you have right now is likely made out of basswood. Basswood generally provides a well-balanced tone and the wood is quite light, without much grain at all.

 

  1. Mahogany is an extremely common guitar wood. This rich-colored wood is not only beautiful, but has a deep, pleasant tonality. Mahogany tonewood has been used to create some of the greatest guitar styles ever designed.

 

  1. The maple/mahogany combination is frequently used in the manufacture of laminated body guitars. These guitars have a sound that simply cannot be replicated as a result of combining mahogany’s deep tones with maple’s sharp clarity.

 

  1. Rosewood, which is quite costly, is often used as a neck wood, but very rarely as a body wood. There is one exception that was produced by a popular brand in the early 1970s. Acoustic Guitars was actually even used onstage by a band that completely permeated pop culture, both then and now.

 

  1. Certain individuals are very fond of walnut as a guitar wood, though this tends to be more about it’s aesthetic than it’s sound. There is certainly nothing the matter with the tonality of walnut wood, but it’s dark coloring makes it incredibly striking.

 

  1. Exotic woods aren’t usually used to produce mass-manufactured guitars, but they are worth mentioning because they’re often part of custom Acoustic Guitar makers’ daily lives. Professional guitarists often enjoy having at least a couple of instruments made from exotic woods. Particularly popular are bubinga, wenge, and muira piranga. You can also choose from a wide selection of other options.
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